The Tanga Tanga Children's Museum in Sucre promotes cultural awareness and understanding among Sucre's multi-ethnic youth while stimulating and contributing to their intellectual development. The Museum serves thousands of Spanish and Quechua-speaking visitors annually from the City of Sucre and surrounding communities and offers hands-on interactive exhibits on Bolivian culture, health, environment, science and renewable energies and technology. The Museum offers

hands-on interactive exhibits on Bolivian culture, health, environment, science and renewable energies and technology. The Museum offers both children and adults interactive theater inspired by world mythologies and cultures whose objective is to create new stories that express the original teachings of particular ethnic groups presented in universally understandable language.
Representing diverse cultural and socio-economic experiences, visiting children will be able to assimilate new knowledge and be encouraged to use their imagination to create their own reality, have fun and learn to know and
respect their own culture and beliefs as well as those from different backgrounds.
The museum complex also includes a green house presenting the ecology of the Bolivian tropical lowlands, an outdoor café, ceramic, textile, and recycling workshops, and school visit programs by area youth.
The Foundation is currently implementing new exhibit areas on the cultural and environmental diversity of Bolivia that are making use of the lovely gardens and terraces of the museum. Exhibits include a depiction of the Quechua, Aymara, Guarani, Chipaya ethnic communities that inhabit the different eco regions of the country.
Plan International/Sucre. Supported a debt swap that helped purchase an additional 7,000 square meters of adjoining land.
The Bolivian, Dutch and Spanish Governments, UNICEF, CESO, FONDESIF/IADB, the Vice Ministry of Public Investment, Spanish Cooperation AEIC, SOBOCE and PROCOSI
Partners/Supporters:
The Municipality of Sucre and the Sucre Local Potable Water and Sewage Company (ELAPAS). They donated approximately 1,000 square meters of land and a 19th century water tank in in Sucre's La Recoleta historic district.